CEN 303 — WELLAND CANAL AND LAKE ERIE, FIRST EDITION, 1996


Chapter 2 — Delete paragraph 94

Replace by: 94      Cayuga Island, close to the north shore of Niagara River Channel about 5 [4] miles below Tonawanda Island, is separated from the mainland by Little River, which outlets at either end of the island. Cayuga Creek flows into Little River at about midlength of the island. Little River and Cayuga Creek afford a well-protected harbor for small craft. A dredged entrance channel leads from deep water in Niagara River through the lower entrance to Little River. In 2013, the controlling depth was 3½ feet [1.1 m]. The upper entrance to Little River, marked by a private 344° range, had a reported controlling depth of 4 feet [1.2 m] in 1980. Depths inside are about 4 to 7 feet [1.2 to 2.1 m]. A fixed highway bridge with a reported clearance of 10 feet [3 m] crosses Little River just west of the mouth of Cayuga Creek. An overhead cable with a clearance of 55 feet [16.8 m] crosses the river about 0.35 [0.3] mile west of the bridge. A fixed highway bridge crossing Cayuga Creek just above the mouth has a clearance of 9 feet [2.7 m].

(C2014-005.01)
(Monthly Edition No. 4/14)


Chapter 2 — Delete paragraph 98

Replace by: 98      North Grand Island Bridge, a twin fixed highway bridge, crosses the river between Niagara Falls, NY, and Buckhorn Island. The bridge has a clearance of 50 feet [15.2 m] for a center width of 260 feet [79.2 m] over the central span of the Niagara River Channel. Two overhead power cables crossing the river about 0.5 and 0.7 [0.4 and 0.6] mile below the bridge have clearances of 79 and 75 feet [24.1 and 22.9 m], respectively. Cable support towers in the river are marked by lights.

(C2014-004.01)
(Monthly Edition No. 4/14)


Chapter 3 — After paragraph 9

Insert: 9.1      Caution. — Many wrecks (some uncharted) litter the bottom of Lake Erie. As they constitute navigation and anchoring hazards, the mariner is advised to consult the most up-to-date copy of their chart.

(C2014-012.01)
(Monthly Edition No. 7/14)


Chapter 3 — Adjacent to paragraph 9.1, add a caution pictograph.

(C2014-012.02)
(Monthly Edition No. 7/14)


Chapter 4 — After paragraph 2

Insert: 2.1      Caution. — Many wrecks (some uncharted) litter the bottom of Lake Erie. As they constitute navigation and anchoring hazards, the mariner is advised to consult the most up-to-date copy of their chart.

(C2014-012.03)
(Monthly Edition No. 7/14)


Chapter 4 — Adjacent to paragraph 2.1, add a caution pictograph.

(C2014-012.04)
(Monthly Edition No. 7/14)


Chapter 5 — After paragraph 2

Insert: 2.1      Caution. — Many wrecks (some uncharted) litter the bottom of Lake Erie. As they constitute navigation and anchoring hazards, the mariner is advised to consult the most up-to-date copy of their chart.

(C2014-012.05)
(Monthly Edition No. 7/14)


Chapter 5 — Adjacent to paragraph 2.1, add a caution pictograph.

(C2014-012.06)
(Monthly Edition No. 7/14)


Chapter 5 — Delete paragraphs 65 and 66

Replace by: 65      Put-In-Bay, OH, a harbor on the south side of the bay, is used principally for fruit shipments and excursion business. Ferry service is available to Sandusky, Port Clinton, and Kelleys Island. The approach to the harbor is marked by lighted and unlighted buoys. A dredged channel, marked by buoys, leads west along the piers on the south side of the bay.

(C2014-006.01)
(Monthly Edition No. 5/14)


Chapter 5 — Delete paragraph 83

Replace by: 83      No distinct bars form in the dredged channel, which is, however, subject to considerable fill along the south sides each year. Depths in Maumee Bay outside of the improved channel are less than 10 feet [3 m], and navigation is possible for small boats only. In the lake, dredge operations have thrown up a ridge of earth along the edges of the channel. This ridge may rise as much as 3 feet [0.9 m] above the natural lake bottom.

(C2014-012.03)
(Monthly Edition No. 7/14)